Monday, February 22, 2016

Reeds and crushed ice

I’ve been planning to post about something else but the winter landscapes, or rather seascapes, of our new hometown are keeping a hold on me.





We made our latest visit to the seaside on a rather bright afternoon when the sun created a gentle reddish glow on the dry reeds and seashore rocks.





The sea was almost unfrozen again except for the coves and some crushed ice rocking up and down on top of the waves by one of the beaches.





It will be a while until these boats will be launched. This time of the year you sometimes wonder how anyone living in a country with such a long winter season would ever bother to engage themselves in any serious summer activities. In a couple of months it will all come back to you like a thunderbolt.



Kukkarokivi (below) is the largest visible glacial erratic in our country and a protected natural monument rising 12m above sea level off the Ruissalo island. The name translates ‘Pouch rock’ and derives from a legend that the giant who threw it there had been carrying it on his back in a big pouch.


8 comments:

  1. Your new location is giving us such wonderful images to enjoy. I quite happy to see more winter landscapes! I hadn't heard of glacial erratic rock. I have just looked at an image of the largest one in the UK,it is tiny compared with yours! Sarah x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Being one of the places effected by the ice age the most, we have quite a lot of glacial erratics that were transported by glacial ice far away from their original location. The latest ice age is also the reason for the many lakes in Fennoscandia and Canada: they were formed by the constant movement of the thick and heavy glacier.

      Delete
  2. The reeds and the ice make a perfect juxtaposition with one another.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My plan was to shoot the waves but the reeds turned out to be a much more favourable subject.

      Delete
  3. More gorgeous photos. Don't think I can ever have enough that kind of landscape. My favourite is the photo of the broken down jetty with the reeds in the distance. Stunning! Keep warm. Barbara X

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was thinking you might comment on that. It is my favourite, too.

      Delete
  4. Wow, that erratic really is enormous isn't it!!! I have never seen such a thing. I have only ever seen quite small boulders, that is incredible. The ice is incredible too isn't it, the way that it bunches up and freezes and cracks! Stay warm. xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It measures 27m x 17m meaning 5m of the height is under sea level. Despite the short period in January we've had a rather mild winter so the problems with staying warm are over for now, I hope. Thank you for caring.

      Delete