Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Subtropical bloom

While waiting for … you know what … I must post more of the blossoming Tenerife. This isn’t any comprehensive introduction, only a listing of certain plants I photographed in the neighbourhood where we stayed.




Some of them are familiar from areas with warm climate, such as the magnificent bougainvillea above. They were blooming in various colours including white although I didn’t happen to shoot that one. Note that the colourful parts are, in fact, bracts acting as attractors of pollinators as the actual flowers are so tiny.




In our part of the world the hibiscus or China rose is a common houseplant but there they were growing as shrubs flowering in many colours.



The nerium or oleander (Nerium oleander) is another plant familiar to me from the Mediterranean.


I’m not entirely sure but I believe the above climber is a trumpet vine.



This dwarf umbrella tree (Scheffrela arboricola) of the Araliaceae family formed a hedge bordering a garden. It was intriguing to see the fruit the common houseplant produces when grown in a subtropical garden.



Naturally, there were an abundance of cacti and other succulent plants some of which are native to the Canary Islands. Here are only a few examples as my attention was most of the time drawn to the more conspicuous bright-coloured flowering, I’m afraid. From the top: crown of thorns (Euphorbia milii), prickly pear (Opuntia), and Canary Island spurge (Euphorbia canariensis).

Now a couple of fascinating trees. I had to do quite a bit of searching to find the name of the blossoming ornamental tree I spotted arching above the bougainvillea at our hotel. As far as I could tell, it is Tipuana tipu also known as pride of Bolivia.

The second one is a Royal poinciana or flamboyant (Delonix regia) sometimes called flame tree. In early April, it was only just beginning a new growing season. Its ripe dried pods hold loose seeds inside and can be used as toy rattles. Unfortunately, we only came across pods hanging far too high to be picked as souvenirs. Not that we’d have any babies in the family yet but our travelling companions do.




It requires quite extensive networks of automated watering systems to keep the garden and landscaping plants flourishing in these conditions. On contrast, here are a few typical local wild plants with rather unassuming flowering. From the top: broom (Genista), tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca), fountain grass (Pennisetum), and Aloe vera. The last one can also be seen below as a garden plant. With some heavy cropping I’ve taken the photo to the tropics. My hunger for … you know what … is starting to call for desperate measures.


6 comments:

  1. I did enjoy seeing all these sub tropical flowers they are so different to anything I can grow here! Sarah x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad you liked the post. I can't stop thinking about this greenery and flowering because of our present poor conditions: only a couple of degrees above freezing point and a little bit of snowfall several times each day.

      Delete
  2. What a wonderful display of flowers you have captured.
    I saw that large yellow trumpet flower growing in Cyprus this March and also last year in Malta. It is Solandra grandiflora - golden chalice vine - the trumpet vine is significantly smaller.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was over the moon when surrounded by all the blossoming after our dreary winter. Little did I know our spring wouldn't get properly going for weeks after our return.

      Delete
  3. I've enjoyed my sub tropical visit. You have reminded me of all the beautiful blooms I left behind in Spain. B x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We regretted we didn't book a longer holiday in the first place. Had we known...

      Delete